Banana & Pomegranate Custard Crumble

 
Banana & Pomegranate Custard Crumble - Quirky Cooking 

I had two very exciting things happen today – my Quirky Cooking Facebook Page reached 1000 followers (thank you lovely people!!), and I received a special package in the mail – a gigantic, beautiful pomegranate from Royal Pom

I noticed a week or two ago that Royal Pom were offering free samples, so I eagerly took them up on it. I don’t remember ever eating fresh pomegranate before – maybe I have, since my mum loves them – but I can’t imagine that I’d forget that mouth-watering, tangy, juicy, burst of flavour! Wow!

Banana & Pomegranate Custard Crumble - Quirky Cooking

I hadn’t had time to check out pomegranate recipes yet, but I couldn’t wait! I cut it open and tasted it, and decided to make a quick banana custard with crumble topping, with some pomegranate arils sprinkled over the top to jazz it up. The tart, juicy arils remind me of shiny, red jewels that ‘pop’ in your mouth. They are a perfect foil for creamy bananas and custard, and crunchy crumble topping. Such a simple dessert, yet very satisfying. 

 
Banana & Pomegranate Custard Crumble -  Quirky Cooking
Crumble Topping
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Ingredients
  1. 250g gluten free flour
  2. 2 tsps baking powder
  3. 110g butter or macadamia oil
  4. 100g Rapadura(or less if you like)
  5. a handful of raw almonds (optional)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees C.
  2. Mix all ingredients together in the Thermomix on speed 5 for 10 seconds.
  3. Crumble the mixture onto a baking paper lined tray and bake for 10-15 minutes at 180C, until lightly browned and crispy. Set aside to cool.
Notes
  1. For a very simple crumble topping, mix equal amounts of flour, oats/quinoa flakes, and butter/macadamia oil, plus some Rapadura to sweeten.
Quirky Cooking https://quirkycooking.com.au/
While the crumble is cooking, make the custard. You can use whatever custard recipe you prefer, but here’s two options for dairy free, gluten free custards. The banana-chia custard is also egg-free.

Rice-Almond Milk Custard
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Ingredients
  1. 500g rice-almond milk
  2. 60g Rapadura
  3. 30g cornflour or arrowroot
  4. 1 tsp vanilla extract (or vanilla bean paste)
  5. 1 egg yolk + 1 egg (or 1 or 2 eggs, depending on size)*
  6. You can also add a tablespoon or two of butter (if you can have it) to make it creamier
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in the Thermomix and cook at 90 degrees, 7 minutes, speed 4.
Quirky Cooking https://quirkycooking.com.au/
Egg-Free Banana Chia Custard
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Ingredients
  1. 100g raw cashews
  2. 30g white chia seeds
  3. 30g gf cornflour
  4. 550g water
  5. 50g honey
  6. 1 large banana quartered
Instructions
  1. Grind together cashews, chia seeds and cornflour for 15 seconds on speed 9.
  2. Add water and blend for 1 minute on speed 9.
  3. Add honey, banana and blend 20 seconds at speed 8.
  4. Cook at 90C for 7 minutes, speed 4.
  5. Put it together: Slice up 2 or 3 bananas and layer them on the bottom of your dessert dishes. Pour the hot custard over the top so the bananas are completely covered, then crumble up some crumble mixture and sprinkle it over the top.
  6. Top with fresh pomegranate arils.
Quirky Cooking https://quirkycooking.com.au/
 

That’s it! So simple… enjoy!

9 thoughts on “Banana & Pomegranate Custard Crumble

  1. Brook says:

    Oh my goodness that looks and sounds sooooo delicious! Please dont tell me you are so talented you also take and produce the gorgeous photos of your food, ill just die of inadequacy! Brook 🙂

  2. Linda says:

    Oh how I miss bananas….. They are still $17.99kg over here and I just won’t pay that much!

    Ps – write a book…..
    Have I mentioned that at all today?

    🙂

  3. ThermomixBlogger Helene says:

    I have blown up some balloons here to celebrate your 1000 facebook milestone — CONGRATULATIONS!

    How fun for you to rediscover pomegranate. I love it because it’s red, pretty, and the juice is awesome. The arils have such a lovely fresh ‘crunch’ to them too. We eat quite a lot of it here due to the recent marketing push on these lovely fruits and the fact that they are now bigger (like the one in your hand!) and more readily available than ever before. Do you know the trick for getting the seeds out easily with less mess and staining? You put the peeled pomegranate in a bowl or sink full of water to break it up. The sections come apart easily and the juice doesn’t squirt all over your kitchen (and clothing!)
    😉

  4. Jo Whitton says:

    @Brook: Thank you! Yes, I do take my own photos 🙂 I’ve always loved photography and art, and finally got a decent camera again after years of using a little digital ‘point & shoot’… so I’m having fun with the photos! 😀

    @Linda: Sorry to use bananas when they’re so expensive just about everywhere else! At our local shop they’ve never gone over $6/kg, and are often less. 🙂 And thanks for the encouragement about the book – if enough people keep hassling me I might actually get it done!! 😉

    @Helene: Yippeeee!! Thank you for celebrating with me! 😀 Yes, I’m loving pomegranate right now! My Grandma used to use them on fruit salads, and I remember Mum using the syrup for something, but I’ve never actually bought one and pulled it apart and cooked with it before – LOVE!!!! Thanks for the tips for peeling them – I must admit, it took me ages and was quite messy! But worth it. 🙂 When you say ‘peeled’ do you mean take all the sections out of the thick skin? Then put those sections in the water? Thanks.

    Jo 🙂

  5. Ruth says:

    hi Jo. looks fantastic, I will see if they have any in Perth.The royal pom website has instructions on preparation, and the water method mentioned above by Helene.

  6. Anonymous says:

    To get the seeds out you can cut a circle around the flower end (the part that pokes out) then slice down the side (as if you were cutting a tulip form). The thick outer skin can then be pealed away. You can put the rest under water and pull apart gently; the thin tan colored skin which is bitter will float to the top. Opening a pomagranate this way also makes them fairly easy for a child to eat (outdoors, maybe).

  7. Jo Whitton says:

    Oh, thank you for that great explanation of how to get the pomegranate apart properly!! I suppose if I hadn’t of been in such a hurry to get into it, I could have read the instructions on their website – ha ha!! Oh well, I’ll know for next time… and there definitely WILL be a next time!! 😀

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