Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free}

 
Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free} - Quirky CookingI’ve been playing with different variations of gluten free breads for a while now, trying to figure out one that works well without eggs. I’ve finally found one! I got some ideas from different recipes, and after some tweaking I came up with this bread, which is made from ground up chia seeds, buckwheat and quinoa, along with tapioca or arrowroot starch and xanthan gum. It’s simple, not too expensive, and tastes great! The texture isn’t crumbly at all – the chia seeds and xanthan gum work really well to make it soft and pliable.
 
I know someone’s going to ask me if this can be made without yeast – I haven’t tried that yet, but it may work with baking powder instead of yeast… If you try it, let me know how it goes.
 
The secret to getting the texture right on this bread is to cook it for long enough that it’s not still sticky inside. The crust will get quite brown – don’t worry, it won’t dry out. It needs to rise for an hour and cook for an hour, maybe even a little more. You can make two loaves at once by grinding the dry ingredients in two lots, removing the first lot to a bowl, and mixing the two loaves separately. The dough is very thick and sticky, so it’s a bit too much to do two loaves at once.
 
Because it’s a moist bread, it lasts really well for a couple of days. Great for sandwiches, or toast. Add in a couple of handfuls of seeds towards the end of the kneading time if you want a seeded bread.
 
Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free} - Quirky Cooking
 
Update! The other day I started to make this bread, then realised that by the time it rose I wouldn’t have time to bake it as I needed to go out. So I covered it loosely with a plastic bag and popped it in the fridge. When I got home a few hours later, I took it out of the fridge and it had risen beautifully – better than usual! I placed it into the cold oven, turned the oven on to 170C, and cooked it for an hour and it turned out the best it ever has. So there you are – you can make it in the morning, pop it in the fridge to rise, and bake it when you get home at night. Easy. 🙂
Note: You can get fine sea salt for this recipe from my online store here!
 
Chia, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread
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Ingredients
  1. 70g buckwheat kernels
  2. 80g white quinoa or millet
  3. 60g chia seeds
  4. 170g arrowroot or tapioca starch (preferably preservative free, like the one in the photo below)
  5. 1 heaped tsp instant yeast
  6. 1 tsp xanthan gum
  7. 1/2 tsp bicarb soda (baking soda)
  8. 1 tsp fine sea salt
  9. 30g macadamia oil or olive oil
  10. 30g raw honey or rice malt syrup
  11. 250g water, at room temperature
Instructions
  1. Place buckwheat, quinoa or millet and chia into Thermomix bowl and mill 1 min/speed 9.
  2. Scrape down sides of bowl and add remaining dry ingredients, and mix 10 sec/speed 6.
  3. Add wet ingredients and mix 10 sec/speed 6, or until dough comes together. (It will be a very thick, sticky dough.)
  4. Knead on interval speed for 2 minutes.Use the Thermomix spatula to scrape the dough out of the Thermomix bowl, into a baking paper lined loaf tin. (Once you get most of it out, the easiest way to get the sticky dough off the blades is to whiz for a second on turbo, then you can scrape the rest out with the spatula.)
  5. If you like, you can sprinkle the loaf with a little water and use the back of a spoon to smooth the surface. Cover loosely with a plastic bag (so it doesn't touch the dough) and leave to rise for an hour in a warm spot. (Or rise for a few hours in the fridge.)
  6. Preheat oven to 170C. Place bread in oven and cook for approx. an hour, or until nicely browned. Turn out of bread tin and check underneath the loaf to make sure it's browned all over. If not, cook for another 5 to 10 minutes upside down, to brown underneath. Allow to cool on a rack before slicing.
Quirky Cooking https://quirkycooking.com.au/
 
Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free} - Quirky Cooking
 
Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free} - Quirky Cooking
 
Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free} - Quirky Cooking
 
 
Note about arrowroot starch – many brands contain preservatives. I buy this brand from my local health food shop in a 3kg bag; it’s preservative free and much cheaper this way.
 
 
 

96 thoughts on “Chia Seed, Buckwheat & Quinoa Bread {egg free, gluten free & dairy free}

  1. Sarah says:

    Could you do this recipe without yeast? My daughter is on a very strict diet for her eczema and she can’t have yeast, dairy, gluten, egg, seeds or nuts?? its really hard to find a bread replacement.

    • Quirky Cooking Team says:

      HI Sarah, I have never tested this bread without using yeast, so I don’t think it will work without it;-/

    • Quirky Cooking Team says:

      Yes, you can use your food processor for this recipe but probably better to use blender or coffee grinder to mill the seeds prior;-)

  2. Nakita says:

    HI Jo, do you have an alternative to buckwheat? My daughter can’t tolerate buckwheat, almonds, spelt, or amaranth
    Thank you

    • Quirky Cooking Team says:

      Hi Carol. Best yeast is always fresh yeast which you can possibly get from bakeries or health food stores (please check the substitution ratios if using fresh yeast though). If using dried yeast – just make sure they do not contain any preservatives. Any preservative free ones are good to use:-).

  3. Pingback: The best gluten-free bread ever | Beatriz Mendez del Rio

    • Quirky Cooking Team says:

      Hi. I think potato starch might be a bit too heavy for this recipe. Tapioca or arrowroot are the preferable flours for this recipe to work. Hope this helps:-)

  4. Evan says:

    Hi! Your recipe looks great and I’d like to try and make it. Could I confirm something I saw you post a few years back? Someone had asked if they could just use buckwheat flour and not mill the groats. You’d said yes, to just use that weight in the flour, and to skip the milling step. Does that mean that the white quinoa or millet and chia seeds don’t need to be milled at all? Thanks!

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